Halo Engagement Rings

A halo setting features a center stone, which can be either a diamond or a colored stone, encircled by twinkling small diamonds. Halo engagement rings can feature a center diamond of any shape, however round, square, and oval diamonds are the most popular.  The outline of small diamonds can also be of any shape but round and square are the most popular.

With so much customization and sparkle, halo engagement rings have become the preferred choice of brides-to-be. The unique thing about halo settings is, a smaller center diamond creates an illusion of a larger size center diamond, adding more sparkle, while a larger center diamond creates a striking balance of being both delicate and bold.

There are endless ways of customizing halo engagement rings. You can add double row of diamonds to add double sparkle; this setting is commonly known as a double halo. Choosing right setting for your halo will make lot of difference in how your ring will look. A prong setting (classic setting) or bezel setting goes well with halo. One of our designs includes pink gold weaving around the center to create an unconventional look. Our split shank halo engagement ring can be customized with two-tone gold to give it a distinct look.

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SRR114053 (2)pink-gold-engagement-ringsSolitaire rings with a big center rock are every bride-to-be’s fancy but not everyone can have it; a halo engagement ring does the trick and provides a bigger and bolder look with a smaller diamond.

frame_5492015-07-23_200715If you are looking for your dream halo engagement ring, browse our website or visit our store to browse our collection.

Knock Knock! Gold at new five year low and this is the time to buy your desired piece of jewelry

Gold along with Silver and Platinum are trading multiyear lows while we are writing this article. And we always see this as an opportunity for our customers to come by our stores and buy what they have either been planning or have desired to have.

Gold hit its lowest level since February 2010, after a low of $1088 an ounce yellow metal recovered a bit and was trading at $1105 an ounce.

Platinum was even worst hit and sunk below $1000, its lowest in the last six years. Reason sited for this is a perception that supply was increasing while demand was low. At day’s end it was traded at $980.

Silver was trading at $14.83 which is the lowest price for silver in the last six years. Silver seems to have been affected in general by the weakness of precious metal and commodities.

We are looking forward to seeing you at our store. We have a huge selection of bridal rings, engagement rings, earrings, pendants etc.

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Company Claims to Have Produced 5 Carat Synthetic Diamond

A Russian laboratory-grown diamond manufacturer, New Diamond Technology, is claiming it has produced a 5.11-ct diamond, the largest man-made, polished, near-colorless stone ever produced.

Synthetic-diamondAccording to the manufacturer, the unenhanced radiant-cut type ‘IIa’ diamond, produced by the high-pressure, high temperature method (HPHT) bears a K SI grade but hasn’t yet been sent to a lab.

This process is called Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition, where carbon atoms are layered on top of an initial diamond ‘seed,’ fast-tracking a natural process lasting many millennia to a matter of months. And because these stones are lab-made, they’re good for the environment and are free of the ‘blood diamonds’ stigma that’s so tainted their traditionally-mined counterparts.

Diamond Experts familiar with diamond growing, say that it is an impressive achievement, but wondered whether it could be repeatable and also questioned what the stone would fetch commercially.

New Diamond Technology says it has a “new approach” that allows it to produce lab-grown gems with higher colors and clarity from its factories in Russia and Hong Kong. It said that it can produce gems ranging from 4 to 11 carats.

Company President Tamazi Khikhinashvili says that their diamonds are “more affordable” as compared to natural diamonds. He says the company has sold lab-grown gems to customers in Europe, Asia, and the United States.

Elizabeth Taylor’s Trust Sues Christie’s

Elizabeth Taylor’s estate is suing Christie’s, the auction house, over the $8.8 sale of the “TajMahal” diamond, a gift to the late actress from Richard Burton on her 40th birthday.

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The TajMahal diamond was sold by Christie’s along with the rest of Taylor’s jewels and wardrobe in New York following her death in 2011. The collection, which was dubbed the “Crown Jewels of Hollywood,” broke all expectations and brought in $183.5 million to benefit the Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation.

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But the trustees of her estate have now filed a complaint alleging breach of contract. They claim the anonymous buyer of the TajMahal diamond returned it months after determining that it actually does not belong to the wife of a 17th century Mughal emperor.

According to the complaint auction house had only stated that the diamond was of Indian origin, but it still agreed to cancel the sale. Christie’s then requested that the estate return the proceeds of the sale.

Christie’s violated its own policies when it rescinded the sale, the trustee’s complaint states. “Despite facing no credible threat of legal liability, Christie’s nonetheless rescinded the sale of the diamond. In doing so, Christie’s not only deviated from its usual business practices and its own established policies, but it violated its obligations to the trust, all in an effort to appease the buyer.”

Taylor’s trustees claimed the auction house also refused to pass on $3 million from the sale of another gem called the Bulgari Ring.They said: “(Christie’s) failed to pay the trust the proceeds from the sale of the Bulgari ring in an attempt to strong arm the trust into returning the proceeds that the trust rightfully received from the sale of the TajMahal diamond.”

In a statement Christie’s said: “Christie’s was pleased to create a landmark auction event on behalf of the Elizabeth Taylor Trust that produced over $183.5 million in proceeds for the beneficiaries of the trust – the friends and family of Elizabeth Taylor.This suit stems from Christie’s seeking the return of a small portion of these proceeds due to the cancellation of a single item from that sale, and Christie’s looks forward to a speedy resolution of this matter.”